Change – It Starts Right Now

Change – It Starts Right Now

Change is a hard for most people. It requires a lot of will and desire to make that change. My business partner said it the best “One of the best days of your life is when you decide you’ve had enough and you decide to change”. Well I agree. Making changes is like making habits. It takes two weeks to start or end a habit.

You must ask yourself these questions and look at your lifestyle. For example, are you?
• Sitting at a desk
• Sitting in a car
• Sitting in front of a TV
• Sitting in front of a computer
• Eating out at restaurants
• Drinking alcohol
• Eating fast food or junk foods
• Staying up late/not getting enough sleep
The best way to get started would be writing down your goals as a checklist. To start making changes you must start out with having a small goal and a big goal. Baby steps are the only way you won’t get burned out so fast. Try these few changes
• Being active in general (taking the stairs, walking instead of driving, standing instead of sitting, etc.)
• Doing cardio exercise, walk on the treadmill or take the dog out for a walk
• Strength training for all muscle groups. Joining a health club and find a weight training class
• Preparing your own meals and snacks and eating fruits, veggies and whole grains

If you can just think of moving for one hour a day, you will start seeing changes in your habits whether they are good or bad. Then you will make changes to how you are moving. You will be surprised on how good you feel and want to continue on your journey to making those goals happen

I’ve Hit a Wall

I’ve Hit the Wall. What Should I Do?

Here’s the scenario. You’ve been on a roll, working out hard for weeks. Recently, though, you feel unmotivated and bored with your workouts. You aren’t seeing any more changes in your body.
Well, friends, welcome to the wall. You’ve just hit it. It happens. Here’s the good news: Taking breaks is good for the body! The body requires rest. It just can’t function correctly if you’re pushing it too far.
Do this: Take a week off. Eat right and get plenty of sleep. Go slow — maybe take some walks just to keep you moving, but lay low on everything else. Then, at the start of the next week, change up your routine. For example, if you’ve been running on the treadmill, try walking on an incline instead. Try yoga instead of Pilates. Interval training instead of weight training.
There are so many ways to change your routine. If nothing else, trying something new is like a change of scenery for your body. And you’ll start feeling a difference in a matter of a week.

Will and Desire

Will and Desire – If They Can Do It, You Can Too
Last Sunday my husband and I took the dogs out for a run, and saw the inspiration for this particular post. It was a man, an older man, walking with a walker on a trail. He had to be in his late 80s. Smile on his face. Whistling. I turned to Ross and said, now that’s what it means to have the will and the desire to keep moving. I hope when we’re that age, we still have that will and desire to MOVE, just get out there and smell the sweet summer air and move the body.
I don’t know what external or internal factors caused the man on the trail to require a walker. The moment passed without any conversation.
But it reminded me of another inspiration of an older man, also instilled with the desire to keep moving. My grandfather. We called him Popa. He had poliomyelitis as a child, and was very sick, for a very long time. We hardly think of polio now, because we’re vaccinated against it when we’re young. But for people who grew up in the early part of the 1900s, polio was a hideous, literally crippling viral disease.
Popa overcame his polio, but for the majority of his life, he wore braces on his legs to keep him stable.
I bet you can guess where I’m going with this. Yes. Popa was an exercise anamoly, especially in that timeframe. He wanted to be strong. He lifted weights, and even went out to the back fence to do squats and stretches. Meaning, he not only had the will and desire to be strong – he also had to do it without a gym membership, or a personal trainer. In the lingo of that (Depression-era) timeframe, he had to “make do with nothing new.” And he hardly missed a day.
We are surrounded by people who’ve experienced debilitating accidents, loss of limb(s), partial paralysis, you name it. And guess what: They lift weights, play basketball, ski, surf — you name it, they do it. They have the will and desire to keep moving.
So I guess what I’m trying to say here is simply this: HEY YOU. Hey you with the two working hands, arms, legs and feet. You with the perfectly fine heart, lungs, internal organs. Get it together. Keep moving.
Because you can.

Finding your goals to good health

Finding your goals to good health

As individuals, we have to define our own goals and use them as our guide. Goals are targets and can (should) be changed as our situations change. We target ourselves for a certain weight or exercise. Perhaps it is exercise related, running a marathon or triathlon, swimming in a race or maybe there are exterior goals such as rock climbing, skydiving or hang gliding. Whatever the case, write it down and have a plan for how you’ll achieve those goals, and DO IT.

What has always helped my through my goals in good health is finding something that I want to train for. For example, every year I walk 39 miles for Breast Cancer. It takes a lot training but I love it because it gives me a goal to get in better shape. I look at my diet and make small changes. I schedule my workouts in my calendar. It gets me motivated. Now, that is a ‘once a year’ event for me and my colleagues. Each year I strive to hit the goal and God-willing I am able to do so. But I think goals are about reaching higher, further than you possibly could imagine. What do I mean? It’s called ‘stretch goals’. What is it you want to accomplish, and can you improve that by 10%? Maybe 20%? Back to my annual walk. Those 39 miles are tough, and in two days that is like combining a marathon and a half! I’m beat and totally tired after the walk…and yes, no running is allowed. I have a certain time to get done, but I would like to beat it (I’m that competitive). How do I stretch my goal? I keep walking a bit faster each mile, put myself on a pace to get done early.

Achieving good health and living a healthy lifestyle is not hard to do. Set your goals and keep them front and center. You’ll find yourself doing things better than you could possibly imagine and reaching higher than ever.

How to Like Your Naked Body Better by Christmas

How to Like Your Naked Body Better by Christmas

Everyone wants to look good naked all the time, but this is the time of year we start to snack and drink ourselves off track, which has a direct impact on how we look unclothed.
Think about it. The holiday eating season is knocking. It starts with the Halloween candy. Then, less than a month later, the Thanksgiving gorge, followed by Christmas cookies and candies and cocktail weenies. Then, we bubbly ourselves through New Years Eve. That’s four major eating/drinking events, in two months. No other period of time contains this much eating/drinking temptation.
Let’s keep you on track! Close your eyes and imagine how good you want to look naked by Christmas. Imagine that sweet little dress you want to wear at your company holiday party, or that new tankini you got for your escape to Hawaii for Christmas.
We have two months, my friends, and a lot can be accomplished in that time frame. But time is limited. To get serious you must start now.
Start with a plan to be active every day. Now is a good time, for instance, to get to the gym and try out the latest and greatest group exercise classes. If you don’t have a gym membership, then bundle up and walk outside. Grab 5 lb dumbbells and pump your arm while walking. Do some walking lunges. At stop signs, do some squats. Who cares if someone is watching? It’s not about them. It’s about how you want to look naked. Keep the goal in sight.
At the same time, turn up the knob on how attentive you are to what you eat. Plan your meals through the eating season. Plan for healthy snacks. On days that end with holiday parties, eat healthy and drink lots of water before you go. Eat your healthy meal at home, and when you are at the party, stay near the veggie tray.
Another angle for staying on track is to challenge yourself. At my studio starting November 15 to December 15, I am challenging my clients to do 30 days of Pilates or some sort of workout to stay on track. I will be monitoring progress throughout the month. Yes, I’m taking measurements and body fat calculations, and naming a winner at the end. The winner gets a 5 pack of Pilates classes.
Since many, if not most of you are not nearby my studio, do it on your own. Challenge yourself at your local gym or at home. Most gyms will test your body fat and take your measurements. Keep a journal of your progress, and when the 30 days are up, reward yourself with something you always wanted. Or, just strip down and see how much you like what you see. If you stick to your plan, you will see results — which will shore you up to keep it going through the holidays.